Announcement of Hiatus

Hey everyone,

Well, as sad as it is for me to say this, REDemption is going on hiatus. The balance of work, life, and comic books is a tough one to maintain for any length of time, so Johnny and I have decided to take a break from it.

He will still be generating a PDF copy of issue #1, so this thing won’t be completely lifeless. Plus he has also volunteered to draw sketch art. This would be cool because then, instead of waiting years for us to get to some of the cool events that happen in the future, you can get a preview of it NOW.

In the meantime, I will continue to post the comics that have been sent to me as guest submissions. Thank you to all who took the time to contribute. Also, I will resume posting the “Origins of REDemption” series of blogs soon…most likely next week. I just couldn’t bring myself to write it today because this hiatus decision was reached this morning, and it kind of took the wind out of my sales. Just because it’s the choice that HAS to be made doesn’t mean it’s the one that will make you HAPPY, as I’m sure some of you know.

I will do what I can to keep REDemption in people’s minds so it doesn’t completely evaporate from memory. After all, someday I would like to find an artist to take up the mantle, as there’s still 99% of the story left to tell.

However, don’t feel you have to wait for me to post a call for artists. If you are a penciler/inker/letterer reading this, and you would like to pick up where the story left off, feel free to email me samples of your work:

redemptioncomic2016@gmail.com

While I may not make a firm offer of partnership to anyone right now, I want you to be confident in the fact that I will look at ALL submissions, and I will tell you if you have a chance of consideration in the future when I decide to pursue this endeavor again.

I’m proud of this story. It is still my magnum opus, and I don’t just mean in length. Even if the story had 10% of the page count it does, it would still be epic. I am also proud to say that, out of all the comments Johnny and I got, not one of them was negative.

Lastly, I am proud of the work Johnny did on this story. This issue #1 is 150% closer to the vision I had than the previous rendition. Thanks for your hard work and sacrifice, brother!

The ride isn’t over just yet, folks. I still have several weeks’ worth of guest comic submissions to post. Plus there is the “Origins of REDemption” and whatever sketch art Johnny sends. So don’t be too sad because this isn’t good bye just yet.

~~~~~Steve

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REDemption: 08/22/2017

Aha! Thought there would be a comic here, didn’t you? Well, due to changes in schedules and life responsibilities, Johnny and I have decided to shuffle around how we do things. Watch the video for a preview of what is to come.

 

Changes Coming Soon

Johnny and I have been discussing changes to the way we approach this comic. Once we have settled on something, y’all will be the first to know! Actually, Johnny and I will know first, but you will be second! In the meantime, enjoy some sketch art of Fitzsimmons (the guy we saw popping out of the trees on the July 11th post)!

The Origins of REDemption Part 11

When we closed last week’s part of the history, I had the first print issue of REDemption in my hands, courtesy of an artist named Chuck. (At this point in time, the story was known by the longer name The Redemption Project.) Unfortunately it was the only issue he would ever draw.

Looking back, I don’t think his departure was a bad thing…not that he was a bad artist or a jerk, but for other reasons. I’m not going to get into all of that here, other than to mention what I have said previously: he thought I should rearrange the story, which would have screwed up my vision.

Now that I think about it, he didn’t say this to me until AFTER he had resigned. So maybe it was just a friendly suggestion in the form of parting words. Who knows? He hasn’t worked on it since that issue, so I guess the importance of his intent is long gone.

This left me floating in limbo. I could not afford some of the rates that people were asking, but I knew it was asking a lot to expect people to draw all of this for free. I tried shopping around via message boards and Craigslist ads again. Eventually someone responded: a young woman whose name I have forgotten, so I will just call her Christine.

At first, Christine told me she was willing to work for a rate of $10 per page. This stunned me, and I asked how she could possibly get away with that. She said it was because she still lived at home and had no bills. I said, “Well, that works!”

I sent her a couple character biographies, and she sent me back samples that were amazing. Then I gave her the script for Part One. Again, incredible results. Finally I said, “Okay, if you are ready to come on board, then I will send you the outline of the entire comic.” She said okay.

And that was where it took a dive.

She wrote me back with a critique of the story, saying how this and that tangent had nothing to do with the main thrust of the plot (meaning the search for a cure to the zombie virus). I can’t remember every change she suggested for the story, but I do remember her closing the email by saying, “In the end, these are only just suggestions. It is your story, and I will draw it like you want.”

I wrote back, saying, “Yes, the story stands as is.” I may have even offered a brief explanation of how the comic was “Dungeons and Dragons meets a Romero movie,” and then explained how D&D campaigns are LOADED with side adventures that have nothing to do with the main story.

Well, she proved her previous statement (“I’ll draw it like you want”) was insincere because once I set that boundary of her being the artist and me being the writer, she never contacted me again. This bummed me out because of the quality of her work, but if the alternative was to compromise my vision, then it’s better we didn’t wind up working together.

A handful of other artists came and went. Some were such blips on the radar that they aren’t even worth mentioning by name. Let’s just say it was a tough search and leave it at that, mmm-kay?

At one point, I got so fed up with the search that I decided it was time for me to take on the artistic duties myself. After all, I was the one who drew that 24-page origin story “Of Forces Beyond” back in high school. Why not?

I asked around for the best books that might help someone learn how to draw. Chuck recommended a trio of books from DC Comics. There were also a handful of books recommended by Jason Brubaker, who is infamous in the webcomic world.

I bought all these up…and then I never got around to opening ANY of them. Life was just too hectic at the time. The freelance writing work was coming in at a fast pace, and those assignments had deadlines so I could not push them aside. Plus my day job did not pay very well, so I had to keep doing overtime. There was a brief point in time where I just gave up on it.

Actually, no…scratch that. I never gave up. However, I had to accept the fact that there were other things in my life that required more attention.

Sometimes we have to put our dreams to sleep, because even they need to rest.

Join me next week for Part 12. I cannot say for sure that will be the last installment, because I thought we’d be done by THIS point! However, there is one thing I know for sure: it will be a fun-filled, passionate read!

~~~~~Steve

 

 

The Origins of REDemption Part 10

Ten weeks into the history of the comic. It has been a great trip down memory lane, even when it came to recalling the frustrating moments. When we last left off, I told you that I went straight from writing Part 4 into Part 5. I wanted to keep the ball rolling while the ideas were popping; no point in pausing the new material so I could go back and type up what I’d just written!

Part 5 is interesting in that the action is grandiose. The team takes over the National Institute of Health (NIH), and there is also a showdown between them, the army, AND the Unexpected Enemy. So much going on!

Writing this story in five parts made me think of the original five film PLANET OF THE APES series. If we follow that analogy, then I guess Part 5 is the equivalent of BATTLE FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES. However, I like to think the only comparison that can be made is that BATTLE ended the original APES movies, and Part 5 ends REDemption.

Why do I hope the comparison ends there?

Because BATTLE sucked, and REDemption: Part 5 does not!

It was a fun challenge for me to figure out how the team could take over the NIH campus. Certainly there was no way a full-on assault would work. Their takeover had to be slow and stealthy. With that in mind, I drew inspiration from two of my favorite video game titles: the SPLINTER CELL and HITMAN games. This worked in two ways: (1) It made their takeover more believable, and (2) it helped me to slowly escalate the drama until the climactic battle happened.

All while I was writing the story, I had kept in touch with Clarence about drawing. Every now and then he would send me a sketch. I figured it was okay if the work was sporadic because, after all, the story wasn’t even done yet. On top of that, the work he sent was amazing. It was like he had peered right inside my imagination and could see how I wanted the characters to look. I had faith he would be the one who brought the comic to life in a way that was closer to my vision than I had even thought possible.

However, what I did not know is how much of his own personal things Clarence was dealing with at the time. I mean, EVERYONE has “personal things,” but his turned out to be much heavier than most. At the time I was not very understanding or empathetic toward his plight. Once I got done writing the story, my mindset was, “You said you wanted to work on it, so…work on it. Show me something. Produce.” His responses became less and less, as there were frequent times when he went off the grid and never looked at Facebook messages or emails. By forcing the issue, I think I forced HIM out of being willing to work on the art.

I never apologized for that. He no longer lives in New York State, nor are we in contact in any way. As unlikely as it is that he would read this right now, I just want to announce it in public: Clarence, I am sorry for pushing the issue like I did and not being empathetic toward you.

At some point during the history, when I realized Clarence was not responding, I started seeking out comic book artists via message boards and Craigslist ads. There were a handful of people who said they were interested but then vanished on me. Eventually I got a response from a gentleman named Chuck, and we started talking more in depth about working together.

Meanwhile, I wrapped up the handwritten version of Part 5. Not one to rest, I jumped into typing up Part 4. However, I could do this only from home, so I had to devise an approach. It wasn’t hard to do: I set an alarm so I could get up before my wife and son. Then I would type up material from 20 pages per day. Since I typed only Monday through Friday morning, this meant I worked through 100 pages per week. Not a bad rate for a guy with a wife, two jobs, and four kids! The story was completely typed out by April 2012.

During this completion phase, Chuck sent me samples of his work. It was a little less detailed than what Clarence had done, but as far as I was concerned, I was happy that (1) he was putting his own spin on it, and (2) somebody was producing SOMETHING.

Chuck drew the opening sequence with the little girl on the hill, as well as the scene that followed after it (the one with Vietnamese scientists in a lab). He compiled all of this into an issue, and he sent me about 10-15 copies of it. I was pleased with it, with the exception of one moment that killed the suspense and the shock of a revelation that happens later in the story.

Unfortunately, this first issue was all Chuck ever got to draw. He wound up getting commissioned for a lot of other projects, and mine had to be cut out.

However, this was not necessarily a bad thing. I think if we had continued to work together, Chuck and I would have not wound up seeing eye to eye on the story anymore. I say this based on something he said to me shortly after he mailed out the copies of issue #1. I’m not going to reveal what it was here (because sharing the disagreement would be to reveal a major spoiler), but I will say that his words showed he disagreed with how the story began.

I thanked him for his input, and then stuck to my guns. I wrote this story with a specific outline in mind that builds toward a certain kind of crescendo. To remove one part of it would be like taking a card out from the bottom of a house of cards.

Despite this disagreement, it still took the wind out of my sails when Chuck had to resign. It meant starting up the search again.

And we will talk more about that next time!

 

~~~Steve

 

The Origins of REDemption Part 9

This has to be the slowest Thursday ever. As proof that it has knocked me for a loop, I am only just getting around to writing this blog post! Well, they always say “better late than never.” Now I am going to prove if “they” are right or not, my dear readers!

When we last visited the history of the comic, I had just whipped up an approach and outline to Part 4 of the story. (REMINDER: I modeled their search for the Immune Child after Captain Willard’s pursuit of Colonel Kurtz in APOCALYPSE NOW.)

However, there wasn’t enough time in my day to let me type up Part 3 while also writing Part 4. I had to choose, so I decided to focus on typing up the mammoth of Part 3, which (in handwritten form) had filled up FOUR 3-subject notebooks.

Needless to say, this was going to take some time. I didn’t want to lose touch with Part 4 completely, so I would take a couple minutes every day to just pore over the outline, making sure it was as tight as I could get it.

Somewhere along the way, I was talking with an old friend from high school about the comic via Facebook. I told her how the protagonists needed to go beyond the quarantine wall to look for a functional lab. She told me about the National Institute of Health (known as NIH going forward) and said that any research into searching for a zombie virus antidote would be bound to happen there.

I’d never heard of NIH before, so I looked it up. (Got to love Google!) While I was not able to get pictures of the interiors of the buildings, I DID manage to find a map of the entire grounds, with each building labeled. This got the old creative juices flowing.

At first I got hung up on the fact that I did not know what these buildings were set up like on the inside. Then one day I decided, “If people can suspend their disbelief and invest in a story with zombies and what not, then they can also accept the fact that I am going to manipulate the interior of every single NIH building.”

So that was what I did. I came up with a plan for how the team could invade the NIH, and I wrote up an outline for Part 5 with that as my starting point.

Needless to say, there is a LOT going on in Part 5. The team has to safely make it all the way east to the NIH. Not only is the Federal government still after them, but they also have to worry about other survivor groups. We are also introduced at long last to a full-blown view of the Unexpected Enemy. Last but not least, I created another major HUMAN antagonist in the form of an insane Army leader named General Phillips. Imagine if Thunderbolt Ross from THE INCREDIBLE HULK comics was completely insane, and you have General Phillips.

There were also some neat little twists that I threw in with FBI Agent Bill Davidson. I don’t want to say too much about what happens with him or we will wander into a spoiler mine field. Needless to say, he is not your typical one-dimensional, stone cold, humorless Agent Hotchner (Thomas Gibson’s character from CRIMINAL MINDS).

Eventually I finished typing up Part 3, and I dove right into writing Part 4. By this point the outline was incredibly well-crafted, so it was just a matter of taking each bullet point and fleshing it out into a full-blown story. Some bullet points took longer than others to bring to fruition, but in the end I think every last one of them was expanded to the necessary length.

My previous pattern had been to write a section out by hand and then type it up. However, that was only because I found myself temporarily stumped with how the action should flow in Parts 2, 3, and 4. I did not have that problem moving from Part 4 to Part 5; both outlines were written one after the other. Therefore I decided to move forward with writing the last segment of the tale. As always, the story flowed out of me almost faster than I could write it down; it’s like the words were all just sitting there in my brain, waiting to be discovered. Whenever a story writes itself, I take that as a good sign.

Now you may have noticed that, all while I am talking about the process of me writing it, I have done very little talking about any artists stepping up to draw it. In fact, the only artist I have mentioned is my former coworker Clarence.

For those of you who may be wondering what was happening on the visual side, fear not! I will address this in next week’s post because guess what? Just because I am closing in on the end of the writing process doesn’t mean the history is done being told!

 

~~~Steve

Brief Intermission

Our main man Johnny has been a little under the weather, so we have to pause in our regular posting schedule. However, to fill the gap I wanted to share some promo artwork. Here is a vision of the soon to be main protagonist of the story, our very own butt kicking, zombie killing Molly Burroughs.

The Origins of REDemption Part 8

When we last left off, I had finished writing the massive Part 3. At the end of it, the quarantine wall had been destroyed, and the Immune Child (who is now 18) took off on the team. Naturally, their next step was to relocate him.

The team relocates to a secret, backup base of operations: a mall, which of course is a nod to the influence of DAWN OF THE DEAD. Why do they do this? Well, you don’t blow up a wall that was built by the Federal Government and NOT expect to be declared public enemy #1. They need to go hide out while things get crazy for a little while. Eventually they start heading out in reconnaissance teams of two, with the aim of doing two things: (1) determining how much of a presence the Feds have on the West Coast still, and (2) trying to gather intel as to the Immune Child’s location.

I sent the outline to Clarence (my artistic friend and former coworker). He wrote back and said something to the effect of, “Wow, you have a lot of interesting developments here! After Part 3, I wasn’t sure how you would keep the momentum going, but this is excellent!”

I already knew that, of course, but it was nice to hear him confirm it.

I had my basic summary: the team needed to find the Immune Child. Once again, this meant they would run into random adventures that were not necessarily related to the main mission. Rather than worry about it (like I did when I panicked over how to write Part 3), I let it simmer on the back burner of my mind while I set about typing up Part 3.

I can’t quite remember when or how the inspiration came for this part of the story. I do remember that I was either thinking about or watching the movie APOCALYPSE NOW. After doing some reading about the movie, I found it was a “Vietnamization” of Joseph Conrad’s HEART OF DARKNESS.

I’d already seen APOCALYPSE dozens of times, but I had never read the book. I went on Amazon and bought a used copy. It arrived a week later, and I dove right into it. I kept a notebook by my side while I read, notating what kind of experiences narrator Charles Marlow had on his way north as he looked for mysterious ivory trader Kurtz.

While the story was well-written, I did not find much that I could use as a model for my story. Maybe it was due to the setting or the action, but I decided it was a dead end to try to update the story for REDemption. Then it dawned on me: I should model Part 4 after APOCALYPSE instead.

Now you may wonder: why was it easy for you to adapt APOCALYPSE to REDemption, but not HEART…when HEART was the source material for the movie??? It does seem maddening, doesn’t it? However, I think the explanation is quite simple: in APOCALYPSE NOW, the story is set during the Vietnam War, which of course was a crazy and chaotic time. It was much easier to relate that kind of setting to my comic, since the West Coast in REDemption is a lawless no man’s land where death could come at any moment. Also, not for nothing, but the experiences Willard has often have a bizarre, surreal, dream-like quality to them.

In short, APOCALYPSE NOW fit the mood of REDemption better. Therefore, what I did was pop the movie into my DVD player, sat down in a chair with a notebook again, and notated the various experiences good old Captain Willard had.

Eventually I realized Part 4 would be difficult like Part 3, but in a different way: I would have to keep track of two stories. One would be the team looking for the Immune Child. The other would be a DIFFERENT portion of the team heading East beyond the destroyed quarantine wall to find a lab where they could test the Immune Child’s blood (if they found him alive, of course).

Actually, did I say I had to tell two different stories? No, I wound up having to tell THREE because in the meantime, the Federal Government also becomes aware of long stretches of the country that are decimated by our as-of-yet unseen friend, the Unexpected Enemy. For this part of the story, I introduced an FBI agent named Bill Davidson, who investigates one area of such destruction and tries to figure out what is going on. Then I had to come up with a way to have all these various segments converge on one another.

Thanks to the influence of a horror author named Michael Slade (which is actually the pen name for a writing team whose members have changed over the years), I think I pulled this off quite nicely. For those of you who don’t know his work, I suggest you read pretty much any title by him/them, and you will see what I mean. My recommendation is that you start right at the beginning with the first novel, HEADHUNTER. Every single novel contains multiple plot lines that don’t seem to make any sense together, until you reach the end and Slade unites them in a way that is so smooth, you wonder why you couldn’t see the connections all along.

Once I had an outline for the various adventures the team would get in while looking for the Immune Child, I ripped through Part 4 at my usual speed.

So you may wonder: what happened when you were done with the handwritten version of Part 4?

Well, for that answer…tune in next week!

 

~~~Steve

The Origins of REDemption Part 7

When last we left, I had finally broke through my writer’s block and had my ideas on how to write Part 3: every four years, the team would get into a new side adventure (for four total), and then two years later they would try to blow up the quarantine wall. By this time, the Immune Child would be eighteen years old.

First I set about writing an outline for Part 3. This gave a brief overview of what each side adventure would be.

It is par for the course that in post-apocalyptic stories, there will be some kind of religious fanatic clan that believes the ravaging of humanity was a curse from God for all the deviousness and mischief we engage in. Meeting a group like that became adventure 1.

At some point while I was trying to think of adventure 2, I had an image in my head of people docilely staggering into the arms of zombies while under the influence of some kind of drug. After all, people in OUR world use drugs to escape their problems, so I figured it was believable that people in the REDemption universe would do the same. I came up with an idea of how they would get this drug, and the rest of the adventure wrote itself.

At some point I wanted the team to rest, so I had them camp out at an old laboratory with a family called the McKinleys. At this point the Immune Child was old enough to start paying attention to girls, so I gave him a pleasant young lady to fawn over named Tara McKinley.

There were other side adventures, some of which required a lot of research. For example, at one point the team is held prisoner in a massive jail. I have no idea how jails are laid out, so I had to go to our good friend Google and type in “prison blueprints” and “jail blueprints.”

Aside from the four main side adventures, I also had the team run into other random enemies (and friends too, of course, but let’s face it: there’s no dramatic impact of meeting people who are nice to you!). In one of these, the team is accosted by a gang that uses a mix of tools and firearms to attack. I have to admit here: this scene was inspired by THE BOOK OF ELI (starring Denzel Washington), although in that fight his enemies don’t have guns. However, one of them does have a chainsaw.

At the same time I wrote the outline for Part 3, I also typed up Part 2. I worked on the outline when I was on break or lunch at work, and I typed when I was home. This allowed me to maximize my time and work at a faster pace. Usually I wait until a story is finished to type it up, but I knew that would be way too daunting of a task if I postponed it with this one.

Part 3 grew…and grew…and grew. I believe the handwritten version came out to well over 1,000 pages. (It’s in a desk drawer at home; I can always look to confirm later.) By the time I got to the end of it, the Immune Child had indeed taken off on the team. I like to think I gave him a good reason for taking off, but that judgment call is out of my hands now. It is suspended in limbo at the moment, but someday it will be in the hands of the readers.

The end of Part 3 gave me an immediate setup for Part 4: the team would have to relocate the Immune Child. However, they would have to be discreet/covert about it. After all, if they went to the trouble to blow up the quarantine wall (which of course was put there by the Federal government), then someone would be coming to look for answers. This provided an awesome dynamic: their need to relocate their savior while also avoiding their enemies.

The team flees from their usual base of operations to a backup hideout, which was a shopping mall. (I don’t think I need to point out that this was a clear reference to DAWN OF THE DEAD, but I will anyway.) Meanwhile in other parts of the country, people have started to get tired of the government’s semi-fascist ways, and they start to revolt. Suicide squads attack the Canadian and Mexican borders, where the Army and Marines are stationed to keep any infected from getting into our country. The squads drive explosive-filled jeeps at the stations and destroy them, which results in the infected getting over the border. If an area becomes too overrun by infected people, then the military bombs them…which, of course, causes even more chaos.

The government was clearly evil, but at this point I wanted to pull what I call my “Tarantino move.” Quentin Tarantino has a way of showing us the more likeable sides of his villains, like at the start of PULP FICTION when Vincent and Jules talk about TV shows and so on. The way I did that was by introducing an FBI agent named Bill Davidson, who is brought in to investigate some damage caused by the Unexpected Enemy. Being a Federal government agent, he is also expected to be an enemy of Molly and company. At first he is, but over time that changes.

I wasn’t sure how to have the team relocate the Immune Child, so for a while my progress on the outline halted. Never one to give myself too much downtime, I started to type up the massive text of Part 3. In the meantime, I kept thinking about how to describe their search for the savior.

I am proud to say that, unlike the struggle I had with Part 3, it didn’t take me too long before I found the inspiration for Part 4.

More on that in the next segment!

 

~~~~~Steve

RIP George A Romero

I can’t even believe I am writing this. Yes, I knew from pictures that George was getting old…but lung cancer? No idea.

I remember when I was a young horror fan, and I heard about the influential NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. I watched it due to the fact that so many hailed it as a classic. However, at the time my tastes leaned more toward super gory films, so I preferred DAWN OF THE DEAD and DAY OF THE DEAD over the black and white film, which seemed too tame to me.

Many years later, I put the movie into context, imagining what it must have been like to see it at the time it came out. Oh movie going public, how can we offend thee? Let us count the ways! (And for the three or four people out there who don’t know this movie, I am going to say: SPOILER ALERT AHEAD!!!)

*In the late 60’s while the Civil Rights Movement is in full swing, they cast Duane Jones…a black man…as the sensible, level-headed, intelligent protagonist. Romero always claimed it was just a coincidence, that Jones was cast merely because he gave the best audition and NOT because a black leading man would be a controversial move. While there certainly is evidence to support this claim (see Duane Jones knock it out of the park when he talks about his experience at Beekman’s Diner), I can’t help but feel the fact that he was black and the climate of the country at the time had SOMETHING to do with his casting.

*A brother comes back as a zombie and eats his sister.

*A daughter comes back as a zombie and devours her dad, then stabs her mom to death with a gardening trowel.

*Our hero has to kill the same little zombie girl.

*In the end, our hero dies.

That’s a hell of a lot of subversion for one movie!

Romero followed NIGHT with THERE’S ALWAYS VANILLA, probably one of his most rare films. Even in this digital day and age you would be hard pressed to find it. Judging from the reviews, I wouldn’t want to bother anyway. Another flop followed (SEASON OF THE WITCH), followed by THE CRAZIES. At the time, I thought CRAZIES was basically NIGHT with insane people instead of zombies. I watched it many years later and realized it has its own charms.

Then came what is my personal favorite Romero film, MARTIN. So much has been written about this movie that I’m not sure what else I can say. It’s about a young “vampire” who has to seduce his victims by doping them up and then has to get at their blood by slitting their arms open with razor blades. The movie alternates between the present and black and white footage, which could either be Martin’s memories of his vampiric past, or they are just fantasies based on what vampires are like in movies and books.

Of course, what came next was his magnum opus, the zombie film to end all zombie films, DAWN OF THE DEAD. Enjoy it as a wild, nasty splatter fest, or invest your brain a little and ponder the swipe Romero takes at consumerism and self-indulgence. Either way, this movie is where it’s at. It also features amazing early gore effects from newcomer Tom Savini. (He also did the effects for MARTIN and had a small role in both movies.)

Romero’s movies were always about social commentary. In most of them, people try to set up new societies that quickly become as volatile as the old ones. (Examples: KNIGHTRIDERS, DAWN OF THE DEAD, LAND OF THE DEAD) However, MARTIN is interesting in that it is about people clinging to OLD ways that don’t function anymore, without bothering to come up with new ones so they can adapt to the modern times.

Many other films followed the DEAD trilogy, which originally concluded with DAY OF THE DEAD but then resumed in 2005 with LAND OF THE DEAD. Many were hit or miss, such as MONKEY SHINES, TWO EVIL EYES (a collaboration with Italian horror hero Dario Argento), and his adaptation of Stephen King’s THE DARK HALF.

Many people view CREEPSHOW as a classic, but I think its five stories are too uneven to warrant such a label, and not for nothing but there is too much emphasis on revenge-based plots. Then there is the movie BRUISER, which is such a godawful mess that I am amazed Romero did not change his name on it. According to the internet, the movie has an overall rating of 67%. The movie has an interesting premise: a man who has no sense of his own identity wakes up one day to find the features of his face gone; in their place is a featureless mask. It is reminiscent of Franz Kafka’s METAMORPHOSES, but then Romero goes nowhere with it. I hung in there and watched the whole thing, hoping there would be some kind of payoff, but there wasn’t. There’s a scene when the main character kills his sleazy boss (who was also having an affair with the protagonist’s wife), and it should have been powerful and intense, but it was just…boring. I mean, there’s really no other way to phrase it!

However, these missteps are minor complaints…mere footnotes in the career of a man who defined a significant subgenre of horror. Best of all, he did it on his own terms. Romero didn’t need Hollywood; he had Pittsburgh. He wasn’t just an inspiration to people in the horror genre; he was a guiding light for ALL indie filmmakers.

Thanks to your amazing body of work, your light still shines on, George.