The Origins of REDemption Part 10

Ten weeks into the history of the comic. It has been a great trip down memory lane, even when it came to recalling the frustrating moments. When we last left off, I told you that I went straight from writing Part 4 into Part 5. I wanted to keep the ball rolling while the ideas were popping; no point in pausing the new material so I could go back and type up what I’d just written!

Part 5 is interesting in that the action is grandiose. The team takes over the National Institute of Health (NIH), and there is also a showdown between them, the army, AND the Unexpected Enemy. So much going on!

Writing this story in five parts made me think of the original five film PLANET OF THE APES series. If we follow that analogy, then I guess Part 5 is the equivalent of BATTLE FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES. However, I like to think the only comparison that can be made is that BATTLE ended the original APES movies, and Part 5 ends REDemption.

Why do I hope the comparison ends there?

Because BATTLE sucked, and REDemption: Part 5 does not!

It was a fun challenge for me to figure out how the team could take over the NIH campus. Certainly there was no way a full-on assault would work. Their takeover had to be slow and stealthy. With that in mind, I drew inspiration from two of my favorite video game titles: the SPLINTER CELL and HITMAN games. This worked in two ways: (1) It made their takeover more believable, and (2) it helped me to slowly escalate the drama until the climactic battle happened.

All while I was writing the story, I had kept in touch with Clarence about drawing. Every now and then he would send me a sketch. I figured it was okay if the work was sporadic because, after all, the story wasn’t even done yet. On top of that, the work he sent was amazing. It was like he had peered right inside my imagination and could see how I wanted the characters to look. I had faith he would be the one who brought the comic to life in a way that was closer to my vision than I had even thought possible.

However, what I did not know is how much of his own personal things Clarence was dealing with at the time. I mean, EVERYONE has “personal things,” but his turned out to be much heavier than most. At the time I was not very understanding or empathetic toward his plight. Once I got done writing the story, my mindset was, “You said you wanted to work on it, so…work on it. Show me something. Produce.” His responses became less and less, as there were frequent times when he went off the grid and never looked at Facebook messages or emails. By forcing the issue, I think I forced HIM out of being willing to work on the art.

I never apologized for that. He no longer lives in New York State, nor are we in contact in any way. As unlikely as it is that he would read this right now, I just want to announce it in public: Clarence, I am sorry for pushing the issue like I did and not being empathetic toward you.

At some point during the history, when I realized Clarence was not responding, I started seeking out comic book artists via message boards and Craigslist ads. There were a handful of people who said they were interested but then vanished on me. Eventually I got a response from a gentleman named Chuck, and we started talking more in depth about working together.

Meanwhile, I wrapped up the handwritten version of Part 5. Not one to rest, I jumped into typing up Part 4. However, I could do this only from home, so I had to devise an approach. It wasn’t hard to do: I set an alarm so I could get up before my wife and son. Then I would type up material from 20 pages per day. Since I typed only Monday through Friday morning, this meant I worked through 100 pages per week. Not a bad rate for a guy with a wife, two jobs, and four kids! The story was completely typed out by April 2012.

During this completion phase, Chuck sent me samples of his work. It was a little less detailed than what Clarence had done, but as far as I was concerned, I was happy that (1) he was putting his own spin on it, and (2) somebody was producing SOMETHING.

Chuck drew the opening sequence with the little girl on the hill, as well as the scene that followed after it (the one with Vietnamese scientists in a lab). He compiled all of this into an issue, and he sent me about 10-15 copies of it. I was pleased with it, with the exception of one moment that killed the suspense and the shock of a revelation that happens later in the story.

Unfortunately, this first issue was all Chuck ever got to draw. He wound up getting commissioned for a lot of other projects, and mine had to be cut out.

However, this was not necessarily a bad thing. I think if we had continued to work together, Chuck and I would have not wound up seeing eye to eye on the story anymore. I say this based on something he said to me shortly after he mailed out the copies of issue #1. I’m not going to reveal what it was here (because sharing the disagreement would be to reveal a major spoiler), but I will say that his words showed he disagreed with how the story began.

I thanked him for his input, and then stuck to my guns. I wrote this story with a specific outline in mind that builds toward a certain kind of crescendo. To remove one part of it would be like taking a card out from the bottom of a house of cards.

Despite this disagreement, it still took the wind out of my sails when Chuck had to resign. It meant starting up the search again.

And we will talk more about that next time!

 

~~~Steve

 

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